Speed

Information related to vehicle speed and speeding.

CASE LAW - R v Ren

BC Courts Coat of ArmsZihe Ren was convicted of speeding for traveling in excess of 80 km/h in the posted 50 km/h zone of the 4900 block of West 16th Avenue in Vancouver. He appealed the conviction citing that:

  1. The investigating officer, by mistaking the model of his vehicle on the traffic violation ticket, demonstrated that he was “obviously absent-minded" and it should be assumed that he was equally absent-minded about his estimate of the accused’s speed; and
  2. The decision is invalid because the investigating officer did not provide calibration records of his “speeding radar".

CASE LAW - R v Chamberlain

BC Courts Coat of ArmsColt Chamberlain was convicted in traffic court for driving at 145 km/h in a posted 90 km/h zone on highway 19 in Delta. He appealed the conviction based on the failure of the Crown to prove that the speed sign in place on the highway that day was posted by the minister responsible for the administration of the Transportation Act and that the sign applied to his lane of travel.

CASE LAW - R v Duplisse

BC Courts Coat of ArmsJeremy Duplissie was riding his motorcycle in the 10,300 block of 272 Street in Maple Ridge. This road has a posted speed limit of 50 km/h. The speed chosen by Mr. Duplissie was measured at just over 100 km/h by Corporal Martin. A ticket for excessive speeding was issued and subsequently disputed.

RESEARCH - Raising Rural Speeds Also Raised Collision Numbers

120 kmh speed signSome sections of rural highways in British Columbia saw an increase in the posted speed limit in 2014 following a provincial government review which included a poll of the population. Within two years some of these increases were rolled back due to rising collision rates. Today a research report released by academics from the University of British Columbia evaluates the effect that the initial speed increases have had since they were implemented.

OPINION - Does Speeding Actually Cause Crashes?

Speed Demon Many drivers believe speeding alone does not actually cause crashes. While not totally inaccurate, this over-simplified phrase does not paint the whole picture. The fact is, very few crashes are caused by one factor alone, and this includes speeding, but downplaying the impact of speeding can prove to be deadly.

SURVEY - Automated Speed Enforcement in BC

SurveyIn a survey dated August 13, 2018 conducted by ResearchCo asked "Do you approve or disapprove of using the following kinds of speed enforcement in British Columbia?"

RESEARCH - Effectiveness of Children at Play Signs

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation commissioned a report to update it's policies regarding roadside warning signs related to children. From the report summary:

CBC RADIO - The Speed Factor

CBC LogoCBC's On the Coast radio program is looking at The Speed Factor this week. The theme of the series is to look at the impact speed has on collisions and why we are not doing more to convince the public that inappropriate speed is an unnecessary risk.

Q&A - Safe Winter Driving Speed

Q&A ImageIn the winter, how do police determine what is a "safe" speed?

OPINION - Point to Point Speed Cameras on the Malahat

CRD TSC LogoThe Capital Regional District Traffic Safety Commission is encouraging your participation, for or against, in it's campaign to increase safety on the Malahat highway. The provincial government has suggested that it will consider a trial of point to point speed cameras (also known as average speed over distance cameras) on the Malahat if the public expresses an interest. Your input is encouraged via e-mail to PSSG.Minister@gov.bc.ca until March 1, 2018.

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