Distracted Driving

CASE LAW - R v Shelford

Tania Shelford is a company driver whose vehicle is equipped with a two way mobile radio that allows her to contact her dispatcher. She was using that radio to acknowledge the end of her shift when she was observed by an RCMP officer who stopped her and issued a traffic ticket for distracted driving. She disputed the ticket.

VIDEO - Texting and Driving

VideoThis video about distracted driving was broadcast by 60 Minutes Australia in 2013. Fast forward 8 years and look around you when you drive. Do you think that the message is getting through?

CASE LAW - R v Payman

BC Courts Coat of ArmsKayvan Payman was ticketed by the Vancouver Police Department for using an electronic device while driving. His hearing was set and on that day he applied to have the matter adjourned. The court denied the adjournment so Mr. Payman pled guilty.

Sentencing was adjourned to a later date and the officer prosecuting advised the court he would be seeking a driving prohibition as part of the penalty.

CASE LAW - R v Bleau

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThe rules surrounding the use of electronic devices while driving have been refined by the BC Supreme Court yet again in the case of R v Bleau. Ryan Bleau was charged for having his smartphone sitting in his vehicle's cupholder using it to listen to a podcast while he drove to work. He was convicted of the offence in traffic court.

CASE LAW - R v Grzelak

BC Courts Coat of ArmsPatrick Grzelak has a habit of driving while wearing earbuds that are attached to his iPhone because they help block out the drone of the highway. He was stopped by police and issued a violation ticket for using an electronic device while driving. A dispute of that traffic ticket was not successful so he appealed his conviction to the supreme court of BC.

CASE LAW - R v Tang

BC Courts Coat of ArmsHao Bin Tang is a class 7 new driver and as such is prohibited from using an electronic device while driving. He was checked driving over the speed limit, flagged to the side of the road and approached by an officer who found Mr. Tang with both hands on a lit cell phone with his head down. In addition to the speeding ticket, the driver was also issued a ticket for using the electronic device which he disputed.

CASE LAW - R v Tannhauser

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThe B.C. Court of Appeal has ruled that having a disabling app on your cell phone cannot form a successful defence. Following an acquittal in traffic court that was upheld by the Supreme Court, the Court of Appeal has allowed the Crown's appeal and ordered a new trial.

CASE LAW - R v Rajani

BC Courts Coat of ArmsOn March 15, 2019 Zahir Rajani was issued a violation ticket for using an electronic device while driving. He had been observed by police to be looking down while driving his vehicle. When stopped, it was discovered that Mr. Rajani had a cell phone in his lap, facing up, connected by cord. The constable could not say if the screen was lit or not. Mr. Rajani disputed the ticket.

Canada Road Safety Week 2020

Slow down and save lives is the message for Canada Road Safety Week 2020. Road Safety Week started in 1985 as a national effort by the Canada Safety Council to promote the use of seatbelts. Since then, it has focused on the four most common contributors to road casualties: not wearing seatbelts, driving while impaired by alcohol or other drugs, aggressive driving and distracted driving.

Spring Distracted Driving Campaign

No Phone#EyesFwdBC! It's distracted driving campaign time. ICBC tells us that distracted driving is responsible for 26% of collision fatalities in B.C. each year. On average, 76 people die each year in a crash where distracted driving is a contributing factor.

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