Passing

Information regarding passing other vehicles

Stopping for a School Bus

School BusAccording to the Association of School Transportation Services of British Columbia, travel by school bus is statistically the safest method of ground transportation in Canada and by a substantial margin. I’m sure that we all expect and demand nothing less when our children and grandchildren are riding those buses to and from schools and school related events. Surely all drivers should understand this and not hesitate to stop when the red lights on a stopped bus are flashing.

CASE LAW - Ilett v Buckley

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThis case examines a collision between a cyclist, Kyle Ilett, and a driver, Leah Buckley, at the intersection of Admirals Road and Seenupin Road in Esquimalt, B.C. Mr. Ilett was riding northbound on the shoulder of Admirals Road nearing Seenupin Road. The shoulder was marked by a single solid white line on both sides of the road. Ms. Buckley was driving her car southbound and turned left onto Seenupin Road when an oncoming driver in slow traffic stopped to allow her to make the turn. Mr. Ilett proceeded through the intersection and collided with the passenger side of Ms. Buckley's car.

BC Bad Driver of the Week - 608PXT

Dark, raining, going home at the end of the day traffic, a lane change leaving very little room and then, to top it all off, the driver puts the brakes on. A lot of adjectives come to mind when I try to describe this inconsiderate person but I will leave it at that. If you are going to make a lane change in conditions like this at least leave a 3 to 4 second gap between you and the driver behind. If you are forced to brake for some reason after finishing the lane change, everyone has a good chance of avoiding any difficulty.

CASE LAW - Borgjford v Thue

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThe matter at trial is the liability for a serious collision that took place on the Coquihalla Highway in an area known as Larson Hill on August 11, 2011. A pickup truck and camper driven by Mildred Eileen Boizard was travelling southbound in the rightmost of 3 southbound lanes at a speed of between 80 and 85 km/h in the posted 110 km/h speed zone. She overtook two tractor-trailer units, one in her lane and one in the center lane. Mrs. Boizard decided to pass and carefully changed to the leftmost lane and remained at her travel speed even though the truck she was driving was capable of a faster speed in the circumstances.

Passed & Forgotten

The topic of choice in the DriveSmartBC e-mail box this past week has been about drivers who pass you in the left lane of a multiple lane highway and then immediately change lanes back in front of you. This action leaves less (sometimes much less) than optimum following distance between you and the driver who passed you. It's as if once passed, you are completely forgotten by the other driver.

CASE LAW - Ali v Fineblit

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThis case arises from a collision at the intersection of West 7th Avenue and Pine Street in Vancouver, B.C. A motorcycle driven by Rizwan Ali had stopped at the stop sign on 7th anticipating a left turn onto Pine. Shirley Fineblit was following behind Mr. Ali and decided to pass by him on the left because he had been driving his motorcycle slowly and she thought he was turning right. Mr. Ali turned left and collided with Ms. Fineblit as she passed by.

Should Bad Drivers be Shamed Publicly?

Deliberately bad drivers seem to be appearing more and more often on our highways. If e-mail to the DriveSmartBC web site is any indication, other drivers are no longer shrugging it off and report offenders in the hope that they will be held accountable. Some, including myself, have taken to posting photos or video of selfish, inconsiderate or dangerous drivers in that hope that public shaming might improve that driver's behaviour.

BC Bad Driver of the Week - 643WNH

Bad DriverThis overtaking driver fails to signal his intention, passes on the right travelling off of the roadway and then fails to stop for the stop sign. He's being selfish by refusing to wait his turn and complicating the traffic flow at the intersection for other drivers. I'm tempted to make my left turn from a position nearer to the right edge of the lane when I see this coming in my rear view mirror, but this is not correct. One must position their vehicle near the center line in preparation for a left turn.

BC Bad Driver of the Week 4

This incident takes place in the northbound lanes of Highway 19 at Northfield Road in Nanaimo. The black pickup approaches in the right turn lane appearing to be turning right. Switching to the front camera view reveals that the pickup driver has decided not to wait with everyone else at the red light and slide through on the right shoulder between waiting traffic and the traffic islands.

CASE LAW - Link v ICBC

BC Courts Coat of ArmsPeter Link was driving to White Rock from Richmond on an evening with 2 to 3 inches of new snow. On highway 99 between the highway 10 and highway 91 exits he was passed by an unidentified SUV. The SUV moved into Link's lane after passing at such a short distance that his windshield was completely covered by snow thrown up by the SUV's wheels making it impossible to see. Mr. Link braked, spun out of control and collided with the cable barrier in the center median. This court case determined that the SUV driver was negligent and responsible for the collision, not Mr. Link.

Syndicate content

Google Ads