Pedestrians

Information related to pedestrians.

CASE LAW - R v Griffith

BC Courts Coat of ArmsOn the 19th of August, 2013 Christopher Griffith stopped his vehicle in the parking lot of the Royal Canadian Legion on 106 Avenue in Surrey, B.C. He became involved in an altercation with people present in the parking lot. Matters escalated to the point that these people advanced on his vehicle brandishing weapons and Mr. Griffith feared serious harm to himself, his passenger and his vehicle. He accelerated quickly away, crossing an adjacent vacant lot and departing northbound on 135A Street.

CASE LAW - R v Khan

BC Courts Coat of ArmsShan Khan was a pedestrian trying to cross 152nd Street at 81st Avenue in Surrey. She crossed to the median barrier dividing the four lanes of traffic and waited for the approaching vehicles to stop. When the vehicle using the lane nearest to her did stop, she began to cross. Unfortunately the driver behind that vehicle did not stop, changed lanes to pass it and struck Ms. Khan.

VIDEO - 4 Ways to Make a City More Walkable

video iconFrom the description on YouTube:

Freedom from cars, freedom from sprawl, freedom to walk your city! City planner Jeff Speck shares his "general theory of walkability" -- four planning principles to transform sprawling cities of six-lane highways and 600-foot blocks into safe, walkable oases full of bike lanes and tree-lined streets.

RESEARCH - Children May Not Detect Approaching Vehicles

school crossing & guardAs drivers, we tend to think that if we can see pedestrians, they can see us, especially during the day. This may not be the case with children if we are driving at speeds of more than 30 km/h. This is also the speed above which the chance of significant injury or death begins to be much higher for pedestrians who are struck by vehicles. We recognize this by posting a speed limit of 30 km/h in school and playground zones, but it could be a good reason to do the same on non-collector residential streets.

Is Hitchhiking Illegal in B.C.?

No Hitch Hiking SignIn case you missed it, there was a publicized furor on Saltspring Island this week concerning hitchhiking. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure announced the construction of a barrier at the Embe Bakery on the Fulford Ganges Road that would interfere with the use of a common spot for soliciting rides from passing vehicles.

READING - Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety

CyclistThe US Transportation Research Board has published the Summary of the 10th University Transportation Centers Spotlight Conference focusing on Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety held on December 1, 2016. This may be of interest to those of us in Canada as our regulatory agencies tend to follow the US lead.

Convenience vs Catastrophe

Exclamation Mark SignSome incidents encountered during a career in policing stick with you for life and sometimes resurface later on as lessons learned. This memory involved a mother dropping her young son off for a birthday party by pulling over and stopping on the right side of the street. He exited the car and excited to join the festivities, ran to the back and darted across the street. He was struck and killed by a passing vehicle.

VIEWPOINT - No One Ever Has the Right of Way

SoapboxOn this site and elsewhere, it is sometimes asserted that under BC law, no one ever "has the right of way" -- that right of way can only be yielded. That is contradicted by the following from the Act:

It's Not Easy Being a Pedestrian

Pedestrian CrossingOur provincial driving manual Learn to Drive Smart devotes an entire chapter to the concept of See - Think - Do Method. See: The pedestrian waiting to cross the street in the intersection. Think: There are no lines painted on the pavement, but it is an unmarked crosswalk and I have to stop for the pedestrian. Do: Yield the right of way to the pedestrian and allow them to cross the street.

In a perfect world, drivers would have no hesitation in stopping for pedestrians, pedestrians would use a crosswalk properly and the authorities would construct roads to facilitate both.

Parking Lots are Hazardous Places

Backing UpI had a bit of a scare the other day when I tried to back out of a space in a busy parking lot. There was a large van beside me blocking my view so I scanned as completely as I could and began to let up on the clutch. No sooner had I started to roll than a woman paying more attention to her smart phone than where she was walking appeared from behind the van. We both slammed on the brakes and after looking at each other for a moment, she continued on her way.

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