Pedestrians

Information related to pedestrians.

Stopping for a School Bus

School BusAccording to the Association of School Transportation Services of British Columbia, travel by school bus is statistically the safest method of ground transportation in Canada and by a substantial margin. I’m sure that we all expect and demand nothing less when our children and grandchildren are riding those buses to and from schools and school related events. Surely all drivers should understand this and not hesitate to stop when the red lights on a stopped bus are flashing.

CASE LAW - Olson v Farran

BC Courts Coat of ArmsShortly before 8:40 a.m. on February 17, 2011 Kristin Olson was walking along Jervis Street at Nelson Street in Vancouver, B.C. She was walking in the direction of Davie Street and stopped to watch for traffic before crossing Nelson. She observed a car driven by Ashraf Farran approaching in the distance across the traffic circle.

How Does a Pedestrian Scramble Across the Road?

Pedestrian Scramble SignI had the pleasure of visiting Banff, Alberta as a tourist this spring. The downtown area of the city has been remade with pedestrians in mind. The sidewalks are wide, speed limits are reduced and the three pedestrian scrambles move a lot of people more safely than the conventional intersection. Clearly, pedestrians are a welcome part of traffic in the core area.

Thoughts on Being a Pedestrian

Pedestrian CrossingI was asked two interesting questions via e-mail this week: “Is it law or simply a rule in BC that pedestrians should walk facing the traffic when there is no sidewalks along the roads? What happens when the highway maintenance company leaves no shoulder to walk on?” As I contemplate my answer, many thing run through my mind. How do we learn to be a safe pedestrian? How many people don’t know the rules for driver / pedestrian interaction? What are the risks in deciding to walk on or beside the highway?

Pedestrians, Road Safety and Sidewalks

Street ProfileI grew up in a small town where there were no sidewalks unless you counted 4 sides from 3 blocks downtown. As children, we didn't pay much attention to the rule that required us to walk on the left facing oncoming traffic but we did make sure that we were on the edge or even off of the pavement when a vehicle drove by.

How to Use a Crosswalk

Walk SignalOne of the major television stations from Vancouver broadcast a news story this past week about pedestrians as a follow up piece for a report on a family that was struck down in a newly marked crosswalk. The footage showed a pedestrian standing on a sidewalk facing the street as traffic drove by without slowing or stopping. In fact, it appeared to my eye that the speed of the video had been increased slightly so that the cars appeared to zoom by. The commentary by the news reader lamented that the drivers just weren't stopping as they were supposed to. The trouble was, at least according to the law, he was not correct and this could reinforce improper expectations between drivers and pedestrians.

Q&A - Pedestrian Problems in Nelson

Motor Vehicle Act section 179:

(2) A pedestrian must not leave a curb or other place of safety and walk or run into the path of a vehicle that is so close it is impracticable for the driver to yield the right of way.

CASE LAW - Little v Einarsen

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThis is definitely an odd case! It shows the value of doing regular vehicle maintenance and keeping the receipts to account for it.

Jason Little was walking across the parking lot of a pub in Nanaimo when he was hit from behind by an unoccupied vehicle owned by Lisa Einarsen. Ms. Einarsen had parked the car at the top of the parking lot, set the parking brake, thinks she left it locked and in first gear and went into the pub. Mr. Little sustained significant injury and at the time of the trial some 6 years later could not return to his work because of those injuries.

Powered Wheelchairs and Sidewalk Safety

Covered ScooterWhen it comes to writing about motorized wheelchairs it is usually that they belong on the sidewalk with other pedestrians and not on the roads with the other vehicles. Less often it is that they don't need licence plates or insurance when operated by someone with a disability. Who would have thought that it might be about driving into and killing another pedestrian on the sidewalk? It happened in Burnaby two days ago.

Q&A - Should the Pedestrian Have Waited?

I pulled up to a crosswalk and a stop sign where there were pedestrians crossing. I came to a stop and let them go. after when there were no more pedestrians in sight I moved forward to see the traffic to ensure it was safe for me to go through the intersection (2-way stop).

As I pulled up a surge of traffic came and I was unable to proceed, which stopped me in the crosswalk.

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