Pedestrians

Information related to pedestrians.

It's Not Easy Being a Pedestrian

Pedestrian CrossingOur provincial driving manual Learn to Drive Smart devotes an entire chapter to the concept of See - Think - Do Method. See: The pedestrian waiting to cross the street in the intersection. Think: There are no lines painted on the pavement, but it is an unmarked crosswalk and I have to stop for the pedestrian. Do: Yield the right of way to the pedestrian and allow them to cross the street.

In a perfect world, drivers would have no hesitation in stopping for pedestrians, pedestrians would use a crosswalk properly and the authorities would construct roads to facilitate both.

Parking Lots are Hazardous Places

Backing UpI had a bit of a scare the other day when I tried to back out of a space in a busy parking lot. There was a large van beside me blocking my view so I scanned as completely as I could and began to let up on the clutch. No sooner had I started to roll than a woman paying more attention to her smart phone than where she was walking appeared from behind the van. We both slammed on the brakes and after looking at each other for a moment, she continued on her way.

A Pedestrian's Near Miss Story

Pedestrian Caution SignI received a very detailed e-mail this week from a lady who described walking beside Willingdon Road southbound, facing in North Saanich during the early morning darkness. She paused, looked both ways for traffic and continued to the point where Willingdon begins and Canora Road diverges to the northeast.

She stopped and checked for traffic again from the small island that is present between lanes. Finding none, she began to cross the single lane. At this point, a vehicle approached from the south began to accelerate and the driver switched from low to high beam headlights.

Q&A - Ticketed for Failing to Yield to Pedestrians

Q&A ImageHad a nice policeman come talk to me today and give me a violation ticket for driving without consideration 144 (1)(b). The offence allegedly happened over 2 months ago in another town 4 hours north of me.

BC Bad Pedestrian of the Week

This one is a bit different as the pedestrian in the video is the subject misbehaving, not the driver. It does show a need to take into account clues from traffic around you as the driver behind me didn't visibly react to the pedestrian wandering into the lane again after I had slowed.

Q&A - Pedestrians at Bertram & Bernard in Kelowna

We have an intersection at Bertram and Bernard in Kelowna that has a pedestrian controlled light on one side that stop Bernard traffic for pedestrians.

Drivers coming south on Bertram can only take a right at Bernard and arrive at a stop sign.

Stopping for a School Bus

School BusAccording to the Association of School Transportation Services of British Columbia, travel by school bus is statistically the safest method of ground transportation in Canada and by a substantial margin. I’m sure that we all expect and demand nothing less when our children and grandchildren are riding those buses to and from schools and school related events. Surely all drivers should understand this and not hesitate to stop when the red lights on a stopped bus are flashing.

CASE LAW - Olson v Farran

BC Courts Coat of ArmsShortly before 8:40 a.m. on February 17, 2011 Kristin Olson was walking along Jervis Street at Nelson Street in Vancouver, B.C. She was walking in the direction of Davie Street and stopped to watch for traffic before crossing Nelson. She observed a car driven by Ashraf Farran approaching in the distance across the traffic circle.

How Does a Pedestrian Scramble Across the Road?

Pedestrian Scramble SignI had the pleasure of visiting Banff, Alberta as a tourist this spring. The downtown area of the city has been remade with pedestrians in mind. The sidewalks are wide, speed limits are reduced and the three pedestrian scrambles move a lot of people more safely than the conventional intersection. Clearly, pedestrians are a welcome part of traffic in the core area.

Thoughts on Being a Pedestrian

Pedestrian CrossingI was asked two interesting questions via e-mail this week: “Is it law or simply a rule in BC that pedestrians should walk facing the traffic when there is no sidewalks along the roads? What happens when the highway maintenance company leaves no shoulder to walk on?” As I contemplate my answer, many thing run through my mind. How do we learn to be a safe pedestrian? How many people don’t know the rules for driver / pedestrian interaction? What are the risks in deciding to walk on or beside the highway?

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