Research

Scholarly information regarding some aspect of traffic safety.

RESEARCH - More Than Paint Needed to Keep Cyclists Safe

painted cycle laneResearch by Dr. Ben Beck at Australia's Monash University collected data on 60 cyclists in Melbourne who rode their bicycles with a custom device (the 'MetreBox') installed to quantify the distance that motor vehicle drivers provide when passing them. More than 18,000 vehicle passing events from 422 trips were recorded.

RESEARCH - Bike Friendly Cities are Safer

CyclistA report from the Mountain - Plains Consortium answers the question of why bike friendly cities are safer for all road users. From the document abstract:

Despite bicycling being considered on the order of ten times more dangerous than driving, the evidence continues to build that high-bicycling-mode-share cities are not only safer for bicyclists but for all road users. This paper looks to understand what makes these cities safer.

RESEARCH - Raising Rural Speeds Also Raised Collision Numbers

120 kmh speed signSome sections of rural highways in British Columbia saw an increase in the posted speed limit in 2014 following a provincial government review which included a poll of the population. Within two years some of these increases were rolled back due to rising collision rates. Today a research report released by academics from the University of British Columbia evaluates the effect that the initial speed increases have had since they were implemented.

READING - Safe System Infrastructure Compendium

Austroads LogoFrom the document description:

This report provides a compendium of knowledge on Safe System treatments and identifies real world experience in the practical application of solutions that can mitigate crash severity.

READING - IIHS Status Report, February 22, 2018

IIHS LogoThis edition of the Status Report looks at rear crash prevention, parking assist and how panoramic glass roofs contribute to higher glass claims.

RESEARCH - Children May Not Detect Approaching Vehicles

As drivers, we tend to think that if we can see pedestrians, they can see us, especially during the day. This may not be the case with children if we are driving at speeds of more than 30 km/h. This is also the speed above which the chance of significant injury or death begins to be much higher for pedestrians who are struck by vehicles. We recognize this by posting a speed limit of 30 km/h in school and playground zones, but it could be a good reason to do the same on non-collector residential streets.

READING - Travel Time Savings and Speed: Actual and Perceived

This report, dated May 2017, produced for the New Zealand Transport Agency. It aimed to understand time saving as a motivation for New Zealand drivers’ speeding in the context of other motivations for speeding, and to investigate the effect of education that aimed to improve participants’ understanding of the costs and benefits of speeding. Findings support the conclusion that drivers’ attitudes towards speeding may be changed through the provision of information on the costs and benefits of speeding. They do not allow definitive conclusions to be drawn about the extent attitudinal change results i n behaviour change.

NEWS - Highway Line Paint Research

New BC LogoWhen the Government of Canada put an end to the use of oil based paint for highway line markings the durability that we had come to expect ended. Since that time the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure has been searching for and testing suitable replacements. Starting this month a new, thicker water-based paint will be applied on major B.C. highways along with a new reflective glass bead in areas where wet nights are an issue.

RESEARCH - Blood THC Concentration and Driver Impairment

marihuanaThe American Automobile Association Foundation for Traffic Safety has released a report titled An Evaluation of Data from Drivers Arrested for Driving Under the Influence in Relation to Per se Limits for Cannabis. Researchers examined Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) and impaired driving arrest investigation data and compared the blood levels of THC to observed impairment. The conclusion made was that a quantitative threshold for per se laws for THC following cannabis use cannot be scientifically supported.

RESEARCH - Bad Drivers Don't Think They're Bad

Road RageResearch led by Dr. Thomas Brown of McGill University in Montreal suggests that "surprisingly, these drivers usually don't consider themselves as risk takers. If drivers don't believe they are risky, they will not accept the need to change. On the other hand, if we and they don't understand their behavior, how can they be expected to change it effectively?" Reported in ars technica, the study compared four groups of 19 to 39 year old male drivers and concludes that the risky driving preference appears to be a useful marker for clarifying explanatory pathways to risky driving, and for research into developing more personalized prevention efforts.

Syndicate content

Google Ads