Road Safety Programs

Information related to road safety programs.

VIDEO - It Can Wait

video iconThe following video is part of the Western Cape Government's Safely Home initiative. The It Can Wait campaign hopes to discourage drivers from using their cell phones while operating their vehicles. For those of us who think that we can safely multi-task while driving the site has this to say:

New Driver Licence Restrictions

New Driver SignsB.C.'s Graduated Licensing Program (GLP) was implemented to develop driving skills in a safe, step by step manner. Today, they are a widely accepted, effective safety measure. The systems that have been evaluated have been found to be very effective in reducing crashes and injuries, and public acceptance is high.

NEWS - May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month

MotorcycleSorry Mate, I Didn't See You! This is probably the biggest concern among motorcycle riders everywhere and with good reason. Last year in B.C., 1,600 motorcyclists were injured in 2,600 crashes. In addition, on average, 34 riders die in crashes each year on our roads. This is what a snapshot looks like today.

Distracted Driving Month in B.C.

No PhoneHey you! Yeah, YOU, put the phone down and pay attention to where you're driving! In 2015 police wrote over 44,000 traffic tickets for distracted driving violations in B.C. ICBC tells us that about 30% of crashes in B.C. involve driving while distracted. Recent changes to the distracted driving legislation saw fines change from $196 to $348 + $175 from 4 penalty points yet look around you in traffic and see how many drivers you can find with an electronic device in hand.

RESOURCE - Children's Traffic Club

Children's Traffic ClubHere's a nice resource from the United Kingdom used to teach road safety to children.

RESOURCE - The B.C. Community Road Safety Toolkit

BC LogoA survey of municipalities in 2015 found that they were interesting in having more knowledge on road safety planning, safety designs, and strategies. The toolkit will be built and distributed as part of the province's Vision Zero initiative and is intended for all agencies with a mandate related to road safety.

READING - CCMTA Newsletter Winter 2016

CCMTA LogoThe Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators is a collection of federal and provincial government members who deal with the administration, regulation and control of motor vehicle transportation and highway safety. This issue of their newsletter contains information on the following topics:

NEWS - Moving to Vision Zero

BC LogoOur provincial government has announced an update of the Road Safety Strategy 2015 to adopt a Vision Zero approach to road safety using a Safe Systems model. This means "that road safety developments must account for the inevitability of human error, limitations of the human body in withstanding force, and the responsibility of road and vehicle designers, policy makers and road users for road safety." The report acknowledges that the top three human contribution factors to road deaths and serious injury are speeding, impaired driving and distracted driving.

RESOURCE - Community-Based Toolkit for Road Safety Campaigns

TIRF New LogoThe Traffic Injury Research Foundation announces the release of a community based toolkit for road safety campaigns. The kit is meant to assist a community in the creation of an effective road safety campaign that focuses on issues of local concern. It contains a series of issue-specific fact sheets related to campaign effectiveness, stakeholder engagement, campaign development, messaging, branding, social media and evaluation.

What Makes Road Safety - Who to Believe?

Question MarkI've just finished reading Eliminating Serious Injury and Death From Road Transport and find myself in agreement with much of its content. The time I've spent in traffic law enforcement and the investigation of a large number of collisions has shown me that many of them are suffered by people just like you and me. We aren't significantly misbehaving, we're experienced drivers and we were doing our best to drive safely in the circumstances. Human error, not lack of driver training or respect for other road users is at the root of more crashes than we would expect.

Syndicate content

Google Ads