Road Safety Programs

Information related to road safety programs.

RESOURCE - Children's Traffic Club

Children's Traffic ClubHere's a nice resource from the United Kingdom used to teach road safety to children.

RESOURCE - The B.C. Community Road Safety Toolkit

BC LogoA survey of municipalities in 2015 found that they were interesting in having more knowledge on road safety planning, safety designs, and strategies. The toolkit will be built and distributed as part of the province's Vision Zero initiative and is intended for all agencies with a mandate related to road safety.

NEWS - Moving to Vision Zero

BC LogoOur provincial government has announced an update of the Road Safety Strategy 2015 to adopt a Vision Zero approach to road safety using a Safe Systems model. This means "that road safety developments must account for the inevitability of human error, limitations of the human body in withstanding force, and the responsibility of road and vehicle designers, policy makers and road users for road safety." The report acknowledges that the top three human contribution factors to road deaths and serious injury are speeding, impaired driving and distracted driving.

RESOURCE - Community-Based Toolkit for Road Safety Campaigns

TIRF New LogoThe Traffic Injury Research Foundation announces the release of a community based toolkit for road safety campaigns. The kit is meant to assist a community in the creation of an effective road safety campaign that focuses on issues of local concern. It contains a series of issue-specific fact sheets related to campaign effectiveness, stakeholder engagement, campaign development, messaging, branding, social media and evaluation.

What Makes Road Safety - Who to Believe?

Question MarkI've just finished reading Eliminating Serious Injury and Death From Road Transport and find myself in agreement with much of its content. The time I've spent in traffic law enforcement and the investigation of a large number of collisions has shown me that many of them are suffered by people just like you and me. We aren't significantly misbehaving, we're experienced drivers and we were doing our best to drive safely in the circumstances. Human error, not lack of driver training or respect for other road users is at the root of more crashes than we would expect.

RESEARCH - Road Safety Campaigns

TIRF LogoQuoted from the Executive Summary: "This report contains an overview of leading theories that provide the foundation for road safety campaigns. It is combined with a comprehensive summary of the research evidence related to the effectiveness of road safety campaigns generally, and examples of individual campaign evaluations regarding drinking and driving, distracted driving, seatbelt use, speeding and vulnerable road users. It also highlights what is known about learning styles based on  educational theories and shares recommendations to help communities develop effective road safety campaigns."

Slow Down, Move Over, Unintended Consequences

With the amendment last month of B.C.'s Slow Down, Move Over law comes the unintended consequences of the misuse of flashing lights. Since yesterday afternoon I've driven past two situations that the law required me to slow down and move over for that had nothing to do with protecting workers on or beside the highway. Unless the operators of vehicles equipped with flashing lights exercise some common sense the law may have to be amended again to deal with misuse.

RESOURCE - Cone Zone, Slow Down

Cone Zone LogoA product of the Work Zone Safety Alliance, the aim of this web site is to illustrate the danger traffic presents to workers on our highways and to educate drivers on how to safely navigate the "Cone Zone." It also contains information for the employers of these workers to assist them in their due diligence to provide a safe workplace. As illustrated in the article on Construction Zones, the seconds that you save by not slowing down will never be worth putting yourself and others in danger.

VIDEO - Drowsy Driving, You Can't Fight Sleep

video iconBetter than singing, turning up the radio, driving with the window down or stopping periodically for exercise, if you are too tired to drive, sleep is the only remedy. A 15 minute nap possibly coupled with consumption of some strong coffee might get you to a point where you can continue for another hour or two. There is no better position to be in than that of being well rested before driving.

RESOURCE - BCAA School Safety Patrol Program

School Crossing GuardThe School Safety Patrol Program is a public service provided free of charge to elementary schools by the BCAA. Part of the CAA's School Safety Patrol Program it is recognized as an outstanding initiative for reducing injuries and deaths among 5-12 year olds.

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