Speed

Information related to vehicle speed and speeding.

CASE LAW - R v Beheshti

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThis case involves Doctor Benham Beheshti who was a physician at a hospital in Port Moody and lived in Vancouver. On August 30, 2015 he was on call and summoned to the hospital to treat a seriously ill patient. He was stopped for speeding on Pender Street and issued a traffic ticket by a member of the Vancouver Police Department.

CASE LAW - R v Gjoka

BC Courts Coat of ArmsMarlen Gjoka was travelling eastbound on the Trans Canada Highway entering the posted 50 km/h speed zone that begins near the Harriet Road intersection. Constable Klear of the Saanich police department was stationed 350 meters into the zone observing and measuring the speeds of approaching traffic. He estimated Mr. Gjoka's speed at 100 km/h and using an UltraLyte LRB laser device he measured the speed at 99 km/h. Constable Klear radioed to Sergeant Stewart directing him to stop Mr. Gjoka for the speeding offence.

READING - Travel Time Savings and Speed: Actual and Perceived

This report, dated May 2017, produced for the New Zealand Transport Agency. It aimed to understand time saving as a motivation for New Zealand drivers’ speeding in the context of other motivations for speeding, and to investigate the effect of education that aimed to improve participants’ understanding of the costs and benefits of speeding. Findings support the conclusion that drivers’ attitudes towards speeding may be changed through the provision of information on the costs and benefits of speeding. They do not allow definitive conclusions to be drawn about the extent attitudinal change results i n behaviour change.

Measuring Vehicle Speed With Laser

Laser GunI can remember the anticipation when our highway patrol unit was issued it's first laser speed measuring device, an LTI 20/20 Marksman. Imagine! Here was a device that we could point at a single vehicle in the traffic stream and accurately measure only it's speed. It was fast enough to re-target and measure the vehicles around it too. No one would want to use hand held radar once we were trained on this.

NEWS - 4th UN Road Global Safety Week

UN Global Road SafetyThe web site for the 4th UN Global Road Safety Week is now active. Scheduled to run from May 8 to 14, 2017, the theme this year is #SlowDown:

VIDEO - Other People Make Mistakes - Don't Speed

video iconThis video comes from New Zealand, another jurisdiction that tends to be more graphic with it's road safety advertising. Two drivers stop in freeze frame and discuss the collision that is about to happen. One apologizes for driving too fast and the other for not stopping at the stop sign. The driver that failed to stop highlights the fact that he has his son in the car. Both bow to the inevitable, re-enter their vehicles and the crash ensues.

CASE LAW - R v Brownson

BC Courts Coat of ArmsNadia Brownson was driving her pickup truck on First Avenue, within a 50 km/h speed zone, in Prince George on a rainy, autumn night. Scotty Bryan and Tony Shubert had been dropped off near the Dominion Street intersection and were crossing First Avenue from north to south near a nightclub. They saw Ms. Brownson approaching but thought that they had sufficient time to cross. They were incorrect. Ms. Brownson's vehicle struck them, killing Mr. Bryan and seriously injuring Mr. Shubert.

Measuring Vehicle Speeds With Laser

Laser GunHave you ever wondered about the instruments that the police use to measure vehicle speeds on our highways? My favourite tool was the laser because it gave me the ability to accurately measure the speeds of individual vehicles even when they were in a group on a busy highway. Although the laser had to be used from a stationary position, either hand held or on a tripod, I was willing to trade my moving radar for it when I worked on busy multi-lane highways.

Solving Residential Area Speeding Problems

Speed DemonThis is a story from Chestnut Street in Parksville, but could just as easily take place on any residential street in British Columbia. It appears that both the residents there and the City Council are upset about the speeds of the drivers who use that street. What no one seemed to agree on was what to do about it beyond asking police to do enforcement and perhaps posting the speed limit at 40 km/h.

VIDEO - Rethink Speed

video iconQuoted from the YouTube video page: Our speed is one of the few things we control on the roads. While speed doesn’t always cause crashes, it always determines the severity of a crash. This is because the speed we travel at creates a force and it’s our vehicle and our bodies that absorb this force in a crash. This means the faster we choose to travel, the more severe a crash will be (whether the crash is our fault or not).

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