Speed

Information related to vehicle speed and speeding.

CASE LAW - Link v ICBC Appeal

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThis is a case from the BC Court of Appeal that upholds a judgement from the Supreme Court. The incident in question occurred when Peter Link was driving his Jaguar in a snowstorm on Highway 99 between the Highway 10 and Highway 91 exits in Richmond. He was driving at a speed between 40 and 60 km/h when he was passed by an SUV that threw a large amount of snow onto his windshield as it passed by. Mr. Link was unable to see as his wipers could not clear the windshield sufficiently quickly. When he braked he lost control of his vehicle and collided with the median barrier.

Introducing Variable Speed Signs in BC

Variable Speed SignThe choice of a safe travel speed depending on the driving environment can be as varied as the number of drivers on the highway. I can recall responding to an injury crash on a icy divided highway where both the ambulance and I were using the left lane and all emergency warning equipment. Even with the urgency of the situation, travelling at 95 in the posted 110 km/h zone seemed to be appropriate to both of us. This was clearly not the case for other drivers as we were passed a number of times by vehicles using the right hand lane.

READING - IIHS Status Report, October 2015

IIHS LogoI can remember stopping a vehicle once and finding enough defects that I felt a vehicle inspection order should be issued to the teenage driver. Later that day I received a telephone call from the teen's father. Would I consider rescinding the order? If I did not, it would likely be too expensive to repair the vehicle and the teen would have to do without. This issue of the Status Report looks at what would be a good choice if you were going to purchase a used vehicle for your teen to drive from the perspective of being both safe and affordable.

CASE LAW - R v Zargarian

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThis is an appeal by Bahman Zargarian from his conviction by a Judicial Justice of the Peace in Provincial Court at Nanaimo on December 19, 2012. Mr. Zargarian's vehicle had been observed in traffic by a constable who visually determined that it was travelling faster than the posted speed limit of 50 km/h. Based on that observation, the constable stopped the vehicle and issued Mr. Zargarian, who was driving, a speeding ticket. Mr. Zargarian disputed the ticket and was convicted in provincial traffic court.

Rossland Slows Down

Map Showing Rossland BCThe City of Rossland has done something rare in our motor vehicle centric world where many drivers think that faster is better. Effective on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 the speed on municipal streets has been lowered to 30 km/h. Hmm you say, that's the same speed as a school zone. Well, not in Rossland, the speed there has been lowered too. It's 15 km/h in pick up areas and 20 km/h elsewhere. Interesting!

VIDEO - The Dangers of Low Level Speeding

video iconThe dangers of low level speeding as explained by the Motor Accident Commission of South Australia.

Bring Back Automated Speed Enforcement

SoapboxAccording to B.C.'s new 10 Year Transportation Plan, safety on British Columbia’s highways and side roads is the ministry’s number-one priority. Four pages of the 56 page report are dedicated to the topic. Aside from physical infrastructure improvements and singling out left lane hogs for special attention, only the slow down move over law is mentioned. My wish is that the province would bring back automated speed enforcement.

CASE LAW - McQuillan v Dean

BC Courts Coat of ArmsThis case involves a collision that occurred on Quarry Road in Coquitlam, B.C. Todd McQuillan stopped the Chevrolet Aveo he was driving on the shoulder just past the crest of a hill in order to photograph a bear that had crossed the road in front of him. Madam Justice Gray found that it was possible that part of the vehicle was in the travelled part of the lane. The road has a posted speed of 50 km/h.

VIDEO - Change Your Mind About Speeding

video iconThis is an anti-speeding television advertisement from Australia that debuted in 2002. It is my favourite anti-speeding video and puts a very different face on the consequences of a crash when exceeding the speed limit by only 5 km/h. For all of you who don't hestitate to travel at 10 over because the police don't bother you this may be a good indication that it isn't the police that you need to worry about.

HUMAN FACTORS - Speeding

Speed DemonIn a public opinion survey of Canadian knowledge of and attitudes towards vehicle safety features, the Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) found that a concerning 67.3% Canadians agree or strongly agree that vehicle safety improvements make being involved in a collision less likely, meaning that they can drive faster. In addition, 17.2% agreed or strongly agreed that they would drive the speed limit or faster if their vehicle had safety features, even though it was raining and they felt it might be risky to drive the speed limit.

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