Research

Scholarly information regarding some aspect of traffic safety.

RESEARCH - Seatbelts on the School Bus

School BusI am frequently asked why school buses don't have seatbelts. The Alabama School Bus Seat Belt Pilot Project put seatbelts in school buses and studied their benefits. The study found a wearing rate of just under 62%. This resulted in, on average, saving 0.13 lives and 7.60 injuries per year. The seat belts were 39% effective in reducing fatalities and 13% effective in reducing injuries.

RESEARCH - Are Older Commercial Vehicle Drivers a Safety Risk?

Truck TractorCommercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program (CTBSSP) Synthesis 18: Older Commercial Drivers: Do They Pose a Safety Risk? explores age-related changes in the basic functional abilities needed to drive safely. The report is designed to help assist industry and labor practitioners in promoting safer commercial operations.

RESEARCH - Human Factors Guidelines for Road Systems

NCHRP logoThis report produced by the US Transportation Research Board's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) explores human factors principles and findings for consideration by highway designers and traffic engineers. The report is designed to help the non-expert in human factors to consider more effectively the roadway user’s capabilities and limitations in the design and operation of highway facilities.

RESEARCH - Shoulder and Centerline Rumble Strips

NCHRP LogoTRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 641: Guidance for the Design and Application of Shoulder and Centerline Rumble Strips explores the design and application of shoulder and centerline rumble strips as a crash reduction measure, while minimizing adverse effects for motorcyclists, bicyclists, and nearby residents.

RESEARCH - Driving While Fatigued

Truck TractorDriver fatigue is an important causal factor in many highway crashes—and is of particular concern in the trucking industry where many operators undertake long haul drives with limited amounts of sleep. Previous studies suggest that fatigue can affect steering performance and speed control.

In real world driving studies and in driving simulator studies, steering performance has been found to gradually worsen with time.

RESEARCH - Driving While Ill is Impairing

Lloyd's TSB LogoLloyd's TSB Insurance commissioned a study that suggests driving with a cold or the flu can impair a driver by up to 11%, comparable to having consumed a double of hard liquor. A single sneeze lasts about 2 seconds, during which the driver's eyes are closed. At a speed of 80 km/h this will mean a travel distance of almost 45 meters.

RESEARCH - Safety Impact of Speed Limiter Devices

Truck TractorSpeed limiters or governors, are devices that control a vehicle engine to only permit reaching a pre-programmed maximum speed. The limited response to this study suggests that limiters reduce the occurrence of crashes, save fuel and reduce tire wear.

RESEARCH - Criminals and Road Safety

MUARC LogoResearchers at the Monash University Accident Research Center (MUARC) have looked at the relationship between the criminal activity of individuals and the potential for their involvement in fatal or serious injury collisions. Not surprisingly, they found that those who engage in anti-social behaviour are also likely to exhibit risky driving behaviour.

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RESEARCH - Effectiveness of Behavioral Highway Safety Countermeasures

NCHRP LogoA significant part of highway safety program activities is devoted to behavioral countermeasures. These include the entire driver control system—from training and licensing to laws and enforcement and sometimes culminating in fines and sanctions. Given the enormous cost of crashes and the importance of driver behavior in highway loss reduction, it is important that behavioral countermeasures be implemented as effectively as possible.

Right Hand Drive Vehicles in a Left Hand Drive World

right hand driveWould you kindly comment on the spate of right-hand-drive (RHD) vehicles that have appeared in B.C. recently? I have always been under the impression that imported vehicles had either to meet, or be modified to meet, Canadian standards before being licenced in Canada.

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