Behaviour

Information related to driver behaviour.

Monitoring & Changing Driving Behaviour

Mentor by eDrivingI've always been interested in driving and technology, so when I had the opportunity to combine the two, I jumped at it. eDriving provided access to their Mentor app for me to test. How would I measure up?

I installed the Mentor app on my tablet as I don't own a personal cell phone. The app is meant to be used on a cell phone but appeared to work properly on the tablet. It was just a bit awkward to put in my truck because of the size.

The "I Can Get Away With It" Mindset

Ticket WriterI've written before about the three Es of road safety, education, engineering and enforcement. The enforcement component was the subject of a comment to me concerning a visible police presence on our highways. The observation was that unmarked cars and what seems like minimal enforcement creates a "I can get away with it" mindset.

My Name is Tim and I'm a Bad Driver

Bad Driver ImageI don't try to be a bad driver, quite the opposite in fact, I try to do my best when I get behind the wheel. However, being human, I occasionally fail. So do we all. Hopefully that sets me apart from drivers who don't know any better, drivers who let their skills slip and drivers who really don't care.

A Comedy of Errors

ICBC LogoThis week ICBC rolled out a new road safety campaign called Drive Smart. It's aimed at increasing driver knowledge, promoting staying focused while driving and looking out for the safety of other road users. There is also a special social media hashtag: #KnowYourPartBC.

Driver Attitude and Automated Enforcement

Red Light Camera SignPerhaps the most effective way to improve road safety is by improving road user attitude. If selfish and unsafe behaviours can be shown as detrimental and users convinced to choose what is beneficial on their own reaching our Vision Zero targets have a better chance of being successful. Some people are willing to change their outlook when it makes sense to do so, but we also share the road with those who are not willing.

Setting a Bad Example for Others

Exclamation Mark SignIt's not nice to take vicarious pleasure from the troubles of other drivers, but sometimes I can't help myself. Yesterday I found myself #3 in line waiting for a red light to turn green at an intersection. The vehicle in front of me was a shiny Porsche Boxster convertible driven by a mature male. The light turned green and he stalled it.

RESEARCH - Children May Not Detect Approaching Vehicles

school crossing & guardAs drivers, we tend to think that if we can see pedestrians, they can see us, especially during the day. This may not be the case with children if we are driving at speeds of more than 30 km/h. This is also the speed above which the chance of significant injury or death begins to be much higher for pedestrians who are struck by vehicles. We recognize this by posting a speed limit of 30 km/h in school and playground zones, but it could be a good reason to do the same on non-collector residential streets.

Some People Still Don't Wear Their Seatbelt

SeatbeltOver my lifetime so far, I've gone from a child who rode on a foam mattress in the back of our family station wagon on summer road trips to a grandfather who would not dream of driving anywhere without grand daughters safely buckled up in proper child restraints. Needless to say, wearing my own seatbelt has become a reflex action. I'm uncomfortable if I don't wear it and don't notice it when I do.

READING - Travel Time Savings and Speed: Actual and Perceived

This report, dated May 2017, produced for the New Zealand Transport Agency. It aimed to understand time saving as a motivation for New Zealand drivers’ speeding in the context of other motivations for speeding, and to investigate the effect of education that aimed to improve participants’ understanding of the costs and benefits of speeding. Findings support the conclusion that drivers’ attitudes towards speeding may be changed through the provision of information on the costs and benefits of speeding. They do not allow definitive conclusions to be drawn about the extent attitudinal change results i n behaviour change.

Drivers Make Two Kinds of Mistakes

stop signI watched a woman run a stop sign the other day while I was out for a walk. I knew that this was a route that she traveled often and she should be familiar with stopping there. I could see that she was checking around her as she approached the T intersection so I'm going to assume that she was in a hurry and made the conscious decision to slow down instead of stop.

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