RESEARCH - TIRF Reports on Teenage Driver Fatalities in Canada

TIRF New Logo The Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) reports 16 to 19 year old fatally injured drivers, especially males, continue to be over represented when compared with older drivers according to a new analysis of Canadian research published over the last decade.

Key insights from the factsheets include:

  •     Males account for 74 per cent of all teen driver (16-19) deaths on the road.
  •     In 2010, more than one-third of teen drivers killed in road crashes tested positive for either alcohol (36.6 per cent) or drugs (39.2 per cent).
  •     Nearly half (44 per cent) of those testing positive for alcohol had one or more passengers in the vehicle.
  •     Speed was a factor in more than one-quarter (28.8 per cent) of teen driver deaths.
  •     Almost one-fifth (19.4 per cent) of female teen driver fatalities were due to distraction.

     

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Comments

"Males account for 74 per

"Males account for 74 per cent of all teen driver (16-19) deaths on the road." inflationary and misrepresenting, such numbers must include the total percentage of driving males and females in the pool to be taken seriously. From my experience girls start driving later than boys, eventhough they may hold a license - at this age girls main objective is to find a bf with a car, not the other way around. So if the percentage of all drivers in the 16-19 category is overall 75/25 boys over girls, then this statistic is presented in a meaningless way, with sexism being its only accomplishment.

"In 2010, more than one-third of teen drivers killed in road crashes tested positive for either alcohol (36.6 per cent) or drugs (39.2 per cent)." How many tested for both? Overlap has to be declared for any potential skew to be absolved. Do they mean to say that a combined 75.8% of the above drivers tested positive for illicit substances, or only 39.2% (with 36.6% of the 39.2% also testing for alcohol on top of drugs)?

"Speed was a factor in more than one-quarter (28.8 per cent) of teen driver deaths."
As opposed to the other 71.2% of crashes that happened between two or more stationary vehicles?
Or do they mean to say "speed above the posted speed limit" or "speed inappropriate to conditions" or "speed" as in methamphetamine, or combined all effects of speed into one "line"?

After a quick glance on the TIRF financial statements for 2010, I can see that this is a charitable entity which receives it's funding from the alcohol industry, banking industry and insurance industry. As such all "press releases" are meant to be leaning to indemnify, protect, cloud and masquerade all the ill-effects of these industries on the matters of driving and safety.
Although they are not as big as some of the usual offenders of the "ZOMG citizens, it's all your fault" offensive.

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