Behaviour

Information related to driver behaviour.

In the Crosshairs

deer in the crosshairsI never know what is going to wind up in the DriveSmartBC e-mail inbox, but it is bound to be entertaining, interesting, thought provoking or just plain letting off steam at an easy target. I read them all, try to reply with reason and civility and often use them as the basis for an article.

READING - The Driver Code of Conduct

Mentor by eDrivingThe Driver Code of Conduct from eDriving's on line road safety magazine Three60 is intended to be useful for helping parents to reinforce safe driving messages to young drivers. Having your teen commit to the principles in the guide while they are first learning to drive will help them to minimize or eliminate the risk inherent in motor vehicle operation.

RESEARCH - Effectiveness of Children at Play Signs

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation commissioned a report to update it's policies regarding roadside warning signs related to children. From the report summary:

Why Should I Behave When I Use the Highway?

Doesn't Play Well With OthersThe theme last week among those that I follow on Twitter seemed to be "doesn't play well with others." Whether the subject of the Tweet was a driver, cyclist or pedestrian the behavior highlighted was either thoughtless or selfish. Add an over the top example that I witnessed on Saturday and I wonder why should I behave when I use the highway?

Little Things Can Make Big Differences

ExclamationI've been riding as a passenger in heavy traffic this past week and have had time to watch and think about what is going on around me. There are many small things that a driver should do out of habit to minimize their chances of being involved in a collision.

How Do We Define A Bad Driver?

Back Window Body Count GraphicHave you responded to our provincial government's request for feedback on the setting of fair ICBC rates yet? The hope is to "introduce changes to the current system to make insurance rates more fair for British Columbians by making all drivers more accountable for their decisions and driving behaviour." The implication here is that bad drivers don't pay their fair share of insurance premiums.

Make the Right Choices

facepalmWe just renewed the insurance on our car. It cost us $764 for basic insurance coverage on our 2013 Honda CR-V. I can hardly wait for next year to see what we will be paying to make up for this year's $935 million ICBC loss.

Monitoring & Changing Driving Behaviour

Mentor by eDrivingI've always been interested in driving and technology, so when I had the opportunity to combine the two, I jumped at it. Edriving provided access to their Mentor app for me to test. How would I measure up?

I installed the Mentor app on my tablet as I don't own a personal cell phone. The app is meant to be used on a cell phone but appeared to work properly on the tablet. It was just a bit awkward to put in my truck because of the size.

The "I Can Get Away With It" Mindset

Ticket WriterI've written before about the three Es of road safety, education, engineering and enforcement. The enforcement component was the subject of a comment to me concerning a visible police presence on our highways. The observation was that unmarked cars and what seems like minimal enforcement creates a "I can get away with it" mindset.

My Name is Tim and I'm a Bad Driver

Bad Driver ImageI don't try to be a bad driver, quite the opposite in fact, I try to do my best when I get behind the wheel. However, being human, I occasionally fail. So do we all. Hopefully that sets me apart from drivers who don't know any better, drivers who let their skills slip and drivers who really don't care.

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