Are You Smarter Than a Learner Driver?

New Driver SignsMy mother learned to drive on the prairies as a teenager. She paid her two dollars, was given a driver's licence and then learned to drive. I learned in my teens as well, studying the driving guide, took a twenty question test, spent some time as a learner, passed a 20 minute road test and I had my licence. My children both took driver training during their Learner stage because I could afford it and felt it was an important life skill. They passed a 25 question test, spent time in the Learner stage, were tested, moved on to the Novice stage, were tested and then got their full licence. Quite a difference, isn't it?

I would be willing to bet that all of us, the middle aged or older better than average driver crowd, would be hard pressed to equal or better the score of a newly minted class 5 driver on ICBC's on line driver's test. I base that remark on what I see happening around me when I drive and the correspondence that I have had with visitors to this web site. Many drivers have failed to maintain the knowledge of the road rules that they need to drive safely and properly. In addition, the rules have changed since I obtained my class 5.

I challenge you! Take the Practice Knowledge Test and answer all 25 questions that will be presented to you at random. Did you answer at least 80% of the questions correctly? If not and you were trying to obtain your Learner's, you would be told to go home and study some more because you didn't have sufficient knowledge of the rules to start learning to drive.

Good luck!

Reference Links:

Learn to Drive Smart

Tuning up for Drivers

Learn to Ride Smart

Tuning up for Riders

Driving Commercial Vehicles

Comments

Woo-Hoo

I passed,,,92%,,,I thought I would get higher though,,,There are still that many Drunks on the road,,30% of crashes,,Wow,,I answered tyred there,,,,Wrong.

And the Bus with the yield sign is a 60km/hr road,,Well I got that wrong as well,,Mostly because I pay more attention to whats happening,so I did,nt see what difference speed made,,Guess I need to read some more on that one.

Not bad for a 50 year old?

Are you smarter than a learner driver?

I go there a couple of times a year and with teenage children in the house staying up to date is easy as there are books around all over the place. It's quite fun to take the test and if you do it enough times you get different questions every time.

I also suggest taking an advanced driving course and then keeping yourself current with changes in this area.

Go have fun.

Mandatory on license renewal

I'd like to see this test become mandatory for anyone renewing their license. Make it 100% to pass but you can take the test as many times as necessary.

Also, I think there is an error in this question - it states that the speed limit is 80 km/h but the law in question applies only if the speed limit is above 80 km/h. I'm not saying the driver shouldn't move over, but I don't think there is a law that says he must move over.

I would also like to see a similar question posed to the following driver to address the issue of aggressive driving - what should he do?

Author of "Letters to a Driving Nation: Exploring the Conflict between Drivers and Cyclists." www.brucebutler.ca

Wrong. No idea about testing criteria.

Sincerely, I don't usually contribute to this forum or any other by trashing another's input, because that sort of stuff (in my opinion) belongs on places like twitter or wherever.

But, keeping it short, I'll reply to Cyclingnation with this.

I'd like to see this test become mandatory for anyone renewing their license. Make it 100% to pass but you can take the test as many times as necessary.

What a waste of time that would be. Multiple Choice tests have been the standard for years, as a method of determining general knowledge. They apply to every license classification in BC, and have done so for years. Few ever score 100%, and many - cyclists, for instance, or pedestrians - never have to take one. And that's why, regardless of whichever authority is currently in charge, bascially every jurisdiction uses them. In BC, - from Airbrake Course Certification down to Class 7 Motorcycle Novice - they use this 80% standard.

I'll remark that pedestrians and cyclists never have to take these tests.

Also, I think there is an error in this question - it states that the speed limit is 80 km/h but the law in question applies only if the speed limit is above 80 km/h. I'm not saying the driver shouldn't move over, but I don't think there is a law that says he must move over.

The law in question that you mention in relation to the practice question from the Class 7 Leaner Knowledge Test is based on the law, the Motor Vehicle Act. The RSBC site has this useful reference.  Fact is, the Keep Right rule applies to roads where the speed limit is 80/kmh or higher. Yes, that's what it says.

As an aside, what you failed to note, even while pasting that question image from the Class 7 practice knowledge test, is that the road sign is wrong. I'll let you figure that one out.

It's Only Half the Story

The link you provided does not tell the complete story. There are actually 2 sections of the Motor Vehicle Act that apply:

Driver on right

150 (1) The driver of a vehicle must confine the course of the vehicle to the right hand half of the roadway if the roadway is of sufficient width and it is practicable to do so, except

(a) when overtaking and passing a vehicle proceeding in the same direction,

(b) when the right hand half of the roadway is closed to traffic while under construction or repair,

(c) on a highway designated and marked by signs for one way traffic,

(d) if necessary when operating snow removing equipment, or

(e) if

(i) the movement of a vehicle, or combination of vehicles, is permitted by and is done in conformity with the terms of the oversize permit issued under the Commercial Transport Act, and

(ii) the width of a vehicle, or combination of vehicles, or the width of a load on the vehicle makes the operation of the vehicle or combination of vehicles on the right hand half of the roadway unsafe.

(2) The driver of a vehicle proceeding at less than normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under existing conditions must drive the vehicle in the right hand lane available for traffic, or as closely as practicable to the right hand curb or edge of the roadway, except when

(a) overtaking and passing another vehicle,

(b) preparing for a left hand turn at an intersection or into an exit, a private road or a driveway, or

(c) passing an official vehicle stopped on the side of or on the roadway.

(3) The driver of a vehicle passing around a rotary traffic island must drive the vehicle to the right of the island.

When drivers must not use leftmost lane

151.1  (1) In this section, "leftmost lane", in relation to a laned roadway to which this section applies, means the lane that is furthest to the left of the marked lanes available for traffic proceeding in the same direction, other than

(a) a bus lane,

(b) a high occupancy vehicle lane, or

c) a designated use lane.

(2) This section applies to a laned roadway if

(a) there are 2 or more marked lanes available for traffic proceeding in the same direction, other than a bus lane, a high occupancy vehicle lane or a designated use lane,

(b) the speed limit is at least 80 km/h, and

(c) the actual speed of traffic is at least 50 km/h.

(3) A driver of a vehicle in the leftmost lane must exit the lane on the approach of another vehicle in that lane, if it is safe to do so, except when

(a) overtaking and passing a third vehicle,

(b) allowing traffic to merge,

(c) preparing for a left hand turn at an intersection or into an exit, a private road or a driveway, or

(d) passing an official vehicle stopped on the side of or on the roadway.

The second section of the two is the new one and is the one referenced in your link.

So this is an error then?

It should read "at least 80 km/h" ?

Author of "Letters to a Driving Nation: Exploring the Conflict between Drivers and Cyclists." www.brucebutler.ca

Yes

At least 80 km/h would include 80 km/h and speeds above 80 km/h.

Error? It could be worded better.

The thing with multiple choice tests is that the applicant should choose the best answer, and 'D' certainly provides that. It's poorly phrased, though.

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