READING - IIHS Status Report, November 2016

IIHS LogoThis edition of the Status Report examines booster seats, collision warning systems and rear view cameras: Most booster seats are good, but beware of some that fail to position the seat belt properly. A study of a combined forward collision, lane departure, blind spot and curve speed warning system found that receiving warnings neither discouraged nor encouraged distracting behaviors. Finally, rear view cameras may prevent 1 in 6 backing crashes.

VIDEO - Surviving the New "Drunk Driver"

video iconHere's a video about distracted driving with a different point of view: how to avoid them! DriveSafeRideSafe believes that all drivers need to be educated about the likelihood they will need to protect themselves from the mistakes of other drivers on the road.

Is Your Vehicle Mechanically Fit?

Scrap CarBeing able to go to our vehicle, put our key in the ignition and drive off to whatever destination suits us is a luxury that we seldom consider. I would dare say that for many of us the only time that we really consider our vehicle is when it fails us.

REPORT - Motor Coach Safety Review

BC LogoThe Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure has released it's final report on the safety of motor coach transportation in the province.

CASE LAW - R v Erfani

BC Courts Coat of ArmsMana Erfani received a two count traffic ticket for not having a valid driver's licence and using an electronic device while driving. She intended to dispute both counts, but on the advice of an insurance agent, paid the fine for the no driver's licence count. On the date set for the trial of the use electronic device count, Ms. Erfani failed to appear and was deemed convicted.

REPORT - Cannabis and Road Safety: Policy Challenges

TIRF logoThe following is quoted from the document's executive summary:

The identification of priority strategies, relevant issues, and implementation plans was a central focus of this study, which can serve to inform road safety strategies for drugged driving. A total of 46 individuals consisting of both line staff and managers from 25 agencies that represented Federal and provincial stakeholders in the areas of law enforcement, transportation and health were interviewed to identify cannabis -impaired driving legislative and policy priorities, the types of knowledge that are most relevant to inform decision -making in these areas, and concerns related to implementation.

Insurance Fraud & Insurance Rates - Who to Believe?

Question MarkOuch! My ICBC insurance rates are going up as much as 42% over the next five years according to an article in the Province newspaper. I already paid $630 this year for the privilege of having my fellow British Columbians help me pay for collision liability if I make a mistake and crash my pickup. I’m not looking forward to paying $895 in 2021, but when you consider how much you could be on the hook for if you didn’t have insurance, even that doesn’t look too bad.

VIDEO - Rethink Speed

video iconQuoted from the YouTube video page: Our speed is one of the few things we control on the roads. While speed doesn’t always cause crashes, it always determines the severity of a crash. This is because the speed we travel at creates a force and it’s our vehicle and our bodies that absorb this force in a crash. This means the faster we choose to travel, the more severe a crash will be (whether the crash is our fault or not).

What Are My Duties as a Driver?

Road Safety Starts With YouLast week we looked at what you should be entitled to expect as a driver on B.C.’s highways. It only seems fair that we should examine what your duties as a driver are this week. As before, if I miss or misstate any of them, you are welcome to e-mail duties@drivesmartbc.ca and express your opinion.

CASE LAW - Dhaliwal v Randhawa

BC Courts Coat of ArmsGurpreet Dhaliwal and Herman Randhawa were driving southbound on 152nd Street approaching 76 Avenue in Surrey, British Columbia. Mr. Randawa attempted to change lanes and, in doing so, struck the driver’s side of Mr. Dhaliwal’s car with the passenger side of his vehicle. At trial, he said that he had shoulder checked, noted the Dhaliwal vehicle behind him and felt that it was safe to change lanes. Mr. Dhaliwal must have accelerated to get though the intersection before the light changed and contributed to the collision.

Syndicate content

Google Ads