Behaviour

Information related to driver behaviour.

I Can Rationalize That Behaviour

SoapboxI glanced at the driver stopped beside me at a red light today. He was busily chatting with someone via the cell phone that he was holding to his ear with his right hand. A marked police vehicle pulled up to our right and stopped to wait for the red as well. The driver beside me noticed, put his phone on speaker, held his hand below dash level and kept on with his conversation.

The Keep Right Attitude

SoapboxThe left lane is so popular lately that when I use the right lane I often find myself behind far fewer vehicles at the next red traffic light. In fact, at one particular intersection on my commute many times I can be first in line. Everyone else seems stuck in the left lane trying to get ahead, fuming, following too closely, making sudden lane changes and often all for the desire to exceed the speed limit and to be faster than everyone else.

Butting in or merging into your lane at the last second

I hear many drivers these days talking amongst themselves how they stay in the fastest lane when the traffic is backed up and to avoid the line, they then attempt to merge by geting as close to the lane as possible and to the vehicle in order to intimidate the driver to let them in. From what I seen, most driver lets them in to avoid a collision. 

Do We Trust Too Much?

SoapboxI was walking to my vehicle after work yesterday and watched the woman on the sidewalk ahead of me approach the intersection. She did not hesitate to step into the crosswalk even though a vehicle on her left had stopped halfway across it waiting to enter traffic. The driver was watching intently to her left waiting for a gap in traffic. The pedestrian checked her stride and I thought that she was going to wait for the driver to notice her before she crossed in front of the vehicle.

People That You Won't Share the Road With

Road RageYou may have seen the road rage video lately where a woman doing the speed limit refuses to move out of the left and lane and a man driving a pickup wants by. He eventually passes and then drops back to wave a single digit and yell at the woman. He finally accelerates heavily and gets back into the lane in front of her, losing control and crashing in the median. She stops to laugh at the outcome.

OPINION - Traffic Calming

SoapboxTraffic Calming in my opinion is a good idea on paper but mostly ineffective in reality. Many municipalities are starting Traffic Calming measures however few are successful in achieving what is effective.

VIDEO - The Distracted Mind

video iconThis short cartoon from Toyota and TED explains why distracted driving is a bad idea. Our brains really do not multitask, they focus on single tasks and when we try to do more than one thing at a time, break these multiple tasks into single tasks totally focused on for short periods of time.

I Break the Rules, But I do it Safely

AngelOne of the most common responses that I received having stopped a driver for a traffic violation was a rationalization or justification for the behaviour I observed. The driver clearly knew that what they were doing was against the traffic laws but in their minds they were still being safe. Exceeding the speed limit, slowing down for stop signs, or even driving on the wrong side of the road could be excused because "No one else was around." If that was the case, where did I and my fully marked police vehicle materialize from?

Wrong Way on the Freeway

Wrong Way SignWhen you are driving on the freeway and the yellow line appears on the right side of your vehicle, it's past time to correct the problem. You are driving on the wrong side of the road! Contrary to what one might think, instances of wrong way driving on divided highways are not rare. Thank goodness most instances are corrected by the wrong way driver before a crash occurs.

VIDEO - From One Second to the Next

video iconThis 34 minute documentary on the perils of texting and driving was created by Werner Herzog, an award winning writer, director and producer. According to the documentary description, Xavier, Chandler, Debbie, and Reggie all know the horrors of texting & driving firsthand.

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